Berliner Philharmoniker II

Daniel Harding, Gustav Mahler: Symphony No. 5

Gustav Mahler's Fifth Symphony enjoys cult status, not only because Visconti appropriated the Adagietto for his film Death in Venice. Mahler's massive symphonies delighted in overwhelming audiences with their magnificence, before the expressionist Arnold Schoenberg discovered a new musical star a few years later. Schoenberg's "air from another planet" captivated British conductor Daniel Harding from an early age. When the seventeen-year-old musician wanted to perform Schoenberg's music with friends, he wrote a letter to Sir Simon Rattle asking him for advice. The latter proceeded to make the student his assistant. The rest, as they say, is history – and Harding is now a regular guest conductor with the Berliner Philharmoniker.

Program

Arnold Schoenberg
Five Pieces for Orchestra, op. 16

Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp minor