A Summer of Passion

When lovers take center stage, there’s no guarantee of a happy ending, but there’s sure to be plenty of passion.

These feelings will be clothed in magnificent sound by operas, concerts, and ballet during the new and extended Summer Festival from July 6 to 23, 2017 at the Festival Hall Baden-Baden. The Festival will be featuring such stars as Rolando Villazón, Spanish dance icon María Pagés, and the opera ensemble of the Mariinsky Theater St. Petersburg under the direction of Valery Gergiev.

No fewer than two operas will set the stage for the 2017 Baden-Baden Opera Festival. First on the program will be Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito in two concert-version performances on Thursday, July 6, 2017 at 7:00 PM and Sunday, July 9, 2017 at 5:00 PM. Along with Die Zauberflöte, “The Clemency of Titus” was Mozart’s most often-performed opera in the 19th century and only fell into relative obscurity in the early 20th century. Peter Tchaikovsky’s opera Eugene Onegin will conclude the Baden-Baden Summer Festival with two performances on July 20 and 23, 2017.

Mozart and Tchaikovsky? It’s true that the two composers and their works are more related than it would seem at first glance. Tchaikovsky, the Russian Romanticist, was a fervent admirer of Mozart, though it was his opera Don Giovanni that he loved above all. Tchaikovsky called Mozart “the musical Christ” and studied his entire oeuvre. By this time, Mozart’s late opera La Clemenza di Tito was already somewhat out of fashion, even if the “generosity” of Roman Emperor Titus remained unforgotten. Titus was known for pardoning rebels and confused young lovers, thus creating the model of a ruler at the service of his people. With La Clemenza di Tito, Mozart erected to the emperor a musical monument for the ages.

Photo: Valentin Baranowski

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Thursday 20 Jul 2017 18:00 H

Tschaikowsky: Eugen Onegin

Staged opera

Eugene Onegin, that uncommonly beautiful opera, is actually not an opera at all. Tchaikovsky himself avoided the word “opera,” speaking ...